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Suncare protection for water babies!

From snorkeling to waterskiing and kayaking, if you're a water baby when it comes to vacations, you'll need to know how to best protect your skin, wet and/or dry.

Why is water-resistant suncare important?


Did you know that water does not block potentially harmful UV rays? Even when underwater, you skin is still vulnerable and, because of the cool temperature, it's easy not to feel the burn until it's too late. Worse, light surfaces such as water reflect UV rays, further accentuating the effects of the sun: sea foam can increase your UV exposure by 25% according to
research.

Children's skin is particularly sensitive to UV rays, and damage caused earlier in life can have consequences later on. Because kids are always running in and out of the pool or sea on vacation, it's essential they wear high-SPF water-resistant suncare and reapply regularly.

Understanding water-resistance and SPF


Suncare products must approved standardized tests to prove they are water-resistant, which is to say they retain their Sun Protection Factor when exposed to water or sweat. An SPF of 30 means the level of UV ray exposure required to cause you sunburn is increased by 30. Likewise, an SPF of 50 means you'd need to be exposed to 50 times more UV than without protection to get sunburn. Of course, everyone is different, and suncare should be adapted to your skin type. Regardless of the level of SPF, sun protection should be reapplied every two hours, and immediately after swimming, toweling off or exercising.

What is Wet Technology?


Studies
have shown that, when regular suncare is applied onto wet skin, the SPF is reduced compared to application onto dry skin. Wet Skin Lotion Technology has been developed by Vichy to combat this problem and ensure constant protection against UV rays even when the skin is wet. Extra Water Resistance gives your skin at least 50% more sun protection even after swimming for over an hour.

Say goodbye to greasy-looking white marks across your skin and floating through the water. Upon application, the innovative formula of Vichy's Ideal Soleil Ultra-melting Milk-gel becomes 100% invisible, even when applied on wet skin, and leaves a fresh, delicate fragrance on your skin. As nourishing as a milk, the gel texture with Wet Technology provides a cooling sensation. Available in SPF 30 and 50, it is effective and simple to use whether applied to wet or dry skin. It is also just as easy to apply over zones with more hair on them - good news for guys!



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